How Giant Ship Engines Are ACTUALLY Tested - DC Machines

How Giant Ship Engines Are ACTUALLY Tested

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In this video, we're going to take a look at how ship engines are tested. We'll see how the engines are inspected and tested, and we'll learn about the different types of tests that are performed on ship engines. Actually most nuclear powered ships are submarines; unless you classify submarines as boats. Size isn't the issue with nuclear reactors on ships, the reactors are smaller than the huge diesel engines but there is the steam turbine to consider as well. The real reason nuclear has not caught on except with subs, carriers and some ice breakers is that meeting safety requirements and nuclear training for shipboard personnel isn't cheap and paranoia about nuclear power limited their appeal. I know of exactly ONE nuclear fueled civilian cargo vessel, that spent much of its career tied up to the dock because other countries wouldn't allow it in. Since WW2 most new cargo vessels have been diesel as well as most passenger vessels, the exception being the US since we don't make any big diesels (12,000+ HP) so we continued with steam turbines that combined high fuel consumption with larger engine crews when compared to the diesels. The result is that there isn't much large shipbuilding in the US and our commercial fleet is very small. The US and the Russians have used a number of nuclear powered military vessels, both surface and submarines, and there have been a handful in other countries. The Russians have several nuclear icebreakers, we don't. We have one operable heavy duty icebreaker that is over 40 years old and a medium duty one that is near twenty, oh, we do have one that is lakebound in the great lakes.

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