The Hypnotic Process of Emergency Aircraft Tires Repair - DC Machines

The Hypnotic Process of Emergency Aircraft Tires Repair

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Welcome back to the another video for a feature on the challenging undertaking of changing Aircraft tires that is vital as it can cause gravely dangers to those onboard, and those along its path. At 3:00 That wheel brake system is built like a top fuel dragster clutch. There are plates splined to the wheel, and sets of splined brake discs with a circle of pistons. That circle of pistons slows down the wheel. Most powerful brake I've ever seen. The big aircraft tire replacement caught my eye, but I like trains as well, and was very much interested in the segment on trains. It takes a lot, to keep up with the preventive maintenance, on both the trains and the planes. Where to start?  "Solid tires" means non -pneumatic, not used on aircraft.  No airplane has payload of 250 tons.  Somebody does not understand the difference between aircraft gross weight, useful weight, and payload.  Impact on landing is not a major factor in tire wear.  The highest stress on an aircraft tire occurs on takeoff roll, and most tire wear occurs during braking after touchdown.  I have never heard of tire replacement rules based on number of landings.  Aircraft tires are probably the most common example of what is known as on-condition replacement. It may need replacement after one landing, but usually it is tread wear limits, flat spots from skids or hydroplaning, low pressure, cracks in sidewall, or even having been on the same axle as another tire that was found to be at low pressure, increasing the load on the remaining wheel. In the real world, a tire may continue in service for an extra day after reaching the tread wear limits because the mechanic has a hangover or does not want to change a tire in sub-zero temperatures. "Rupture during touchdown" is going to occur only if the tire is damaged or at low pressure OR the touchdown was so severe that the whole airframe will have to be inspected for damage. Once again, the tires are under maximum stress at takeoff, not landing. Aircraft wheels do not "bolt to struts." They typically contain bearings that slide onto the axle, and are retained by a threaded nut on the end of the axle. On many aircraft, the axle is not an integral part of the strut, but is clamped into a boss in the strut. On trains, wheel screech is caused by friction between wheel flanges and rails on curved sections of track. Flat spots on tires (yes, steel tires are still tires) cause an obvious thump-thump sound as the wheel rolls.

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